The Origin of Wild Ferrets

The Origin of Wild Ferrets

According to 2006 figures, there are as many as 100,000 domesticated ferrets in the United States, and the ones that are not up for domestication, are probably wild ferrets. Ferrets are said to be a part of the sub species, Mustela putorius furo and they were adopted into human households, initially, as hunters.

According to some, pet ferrets originally descended from Mustela putorius, which is a European polecat. Some have termed the Steppe polecat of the Mustela Eversmannii, as the actual ascendant. Some also consider a hybrid variant to be a true ascendant of domestic ferrets.

According to data derived from Mitochondrial DNA, ferrets were adopted as pets way back in 1500BC by the Egyptians, however proofs are few. The names ferret, originates from furittus, which means little thief, in Latin. Therefore, it is also believed that the Greeks and the Romans had started adopting ferrets as early as 425 BC. Presently, wild ferrets are found in big numbers in Shetland and interiors of New Zealand. Their population has flourished here due to less of competition and non existence of hunting animals of the same size. The region is also home to a unique hybrid of ferrets and polecats. There are several species of wild ferrets, which are found here is big numbers.

The popularity of ferrets as pets has been a trend which has emerged in the last ten years of the 21st century. Ferrets have made successful, intriguing and interesting friends of mankind who have provided them with the companionship they need.

The ferrets have been classified according to the colors and patterns sported by them and the classification is being done by the American Association of Ferrets, which lays down the essential pre conditions for classification. Also known by the name of mustela furo, ferrets are mammals which belong to the weasel family.

Clint is a ferret enthusiast who enjoys giving information about Wild Ferrets. You can learn more about taking care of ferrets the correct way at FerretCareHelp.com.

Find More Mustela  Mustela Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *