Tag Archives: Ferrets

Wild Ferrets – Tracing the History of Ferret Domestication

Wild Ferrets – Tracing the History of Ferret Domestication

Ferrets are mammals which belong to the sub-species Mustela putorius furo and are sometimes called as mustela furo. Today most of the ferrets are pets with some exceptions of wild ferrets.

The main reason for domesticating as with all wild animals was for hunting purposes. But there are different schools of thought about the original species that was domesticated to evolve the present sub-species of domesticated ferrets.

First school believes that the European polecat called as the Mustela putorius officially was the original ascendant of the domestic ferrets today.
The second school of thought believes it was the Steppe polecat of the Mustela eversmannii which could have also originated this species.
An altogether different thought is that a hybrid variety could have also been the originator of ferrets today.

Mitochondrial DNA reveal that it was probably first domesticated by the Egyptians around the 1500BC. But there is no present day indication s to substantiate this claim.

Around 425 BC, the Greeks show some evidence of domesticated the ferrets. As a matter of fact, the name ferret is derived from the Latin word ‘furittus’ meaning ‘little thief’. The Romans too could have used ferrets for hunting.

Present populations of ferrets are found in the Shetland Islands and in remote areas of New Zealand. The reason why they have survived here is because of the absence of competition and similar sized predators. In fact sever colonies of wild ferrets or feral ferrets are found in these geographic areas. New Zealand has the distinction of having the world’s largest ferret-polecat hybrids in the world.

It was only in the last decade of the twenty first century that one saw a sudden spurt in the ferrets becoming pets in the United States. Statistics show that by the end of 2006, there are approximately 100,000 and more domestic ferrets. The American Association of Ferrets sets the standards of categorizing the ferrets according to their colors and the concentration of the color distribution.

Clint is a ferret enthusiast who enjoys giving information about Wild Ferrets [http://www.ferretcarehelp.com/wild-ferrets/]. You can learn more about taking care of ferrets the correct way at FerretCareHelp.com [http://www.ferretcarehelp.com].

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The Origin of Wild Ferrets

The Origin of Wild Ferrets

According to 2006 figures, there are as many as 100,000 domesticated ferrets in the United States, and the ones that are not up for domestication, are probably wild ferrets. Ferrets are said to be a part of the sub species, Mustela putorius furo and they were adopted into human households, initially, as hunters.

According to some, pet ferrets originally descended from Mustela putorius, which is a European polecat. Some have termed the Steppe polecat of the Mustela Eversmannii, as the actual ascendant. Some also consider a hybrid variant to be a true ascendant of domestic ferrets.

According to data derived from Mitochondrial DNA, ferrets were adopted as pets way back in 1500BC by the Egyptians, however proofs are few. The names ferret, originates from furittus, which means little thief, in Latin. Therefore, it is also believed that the Greeks and the Romans had started adopting ferrets as early as 425 BC. Presently, wild ferrets are found in big numbers in Shetland and interiors of New Zealand. Their population has flourished here due to less of competition and non existence of hunting animals of the same size. The region is also home to a unique hybrid of ferrets and polecats. There are several species of wild ferrets, which are found here is big numbers.

The popularity of ferrets as pets has been a trend which has emerged in the last ten years of the 21st century. Ferrets have made successful, intriguing and interesting friends of mankind who have provided them with the companionship they need.

The ferrets have been classified according to the colors and patterns sported by them and the classification is being done by the American Association of Ferrets, which lays down the essential pre conditions for classification. Also known by the name of mustela furo, ferrets are mammals which belong to the weasel family.

Clint is a ferret enthusiast who enjoys giving information about Wild Ferrets. You can learn more about taking care of ferrets the correct way at FerretCareHelp.com.

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Wild Ferrets – Tracing the History of Ferret Domestication

Wild Ferrets – Tracing the History of Ferret Domestication

Ferrets are mammals which belong to the sub-species Mustela putorius furo and are sometimes called as mustela furo. Today most of the ferrets are pets with some exceptions of wild ferrets.

The main reason for domesticating as with all wild animals was for hunting purposes. But there are different schools of thought about the original species that was domesticated to evolve the present sub-species of domesticated ferrets.

First school believes that the European polecat called as the Mustela putorius officially was the original ascendant of the domestic ferrets today.
The second school of thought believes it was the Steppe polecat of the Mustela eversmannii which could have also originated this species.
An altogether different thought is that a hybrid variety could have also been the originator of ferrets today.

Mitochondrial DNA reveal that it was probably first domesticated by the Egyptians around the 1500BC. But there is no present day indication s to substantiate this claim.

Around 425 BC, the Greeks show some evidence of domesticated the ferrets. As a matter of fact, the name ferret is derived from the Latin word ‘furittus’ meaning ‘little thief’. The Romans too could have used ferrets for hunting.

Present populations of ferrets are found in the Shetland Islands and in remote areas of New Zealand. The reason why they have survived here is because of the absence of competition and similar sized predators. In fact sever colonies of wild ferrets or feral ferrets are found in these geographic areas. New Zealand has the distinction of having the world’s largest ferret-polecat hybrids in the world.

It was only in the last decade of the twenty first century that one saw a sudden spurt in the ferrets becoming pets in the United States. Statistics show that by the end of 2006, there are approximately 100,000 and more domestic ferrets. The American Association of Ferrets sets the standards of categorizing the ferrets according to their colors and the concentration of the color distribution.

 

Clint is a ferret enthusiast who enjoys giving information about Wild Ferrets. You can learn more about taking care of ferrets the correct way at FerretCareHelp.com.

The Truth About Marshall Ferrets

The Truth About Marshall Ferrets

Ferrets are actually the domesticated type of European polecat mustela putorius. Mustela is a Latin term which means weasel as well as putorius which means smell bad in latin since polecats have glands that is capable of producing bad smelling liquid as their defense mechanism.

Ferrets are usually captivated and have been bred long ago. In fact, the upper class is the ones that can afford these hounds and were used in hunting deer, games, and wild boar. Therefore, ferrets have become a part of the working classes that are still observed today, particularly in the traditional territories of North England.

Although ferrets have the reputation that is somehow unpleasant like they are considered as smell, savage, not trustful and bad tempered, but still many people are having them as pets. Such thinking is actually far from the truth. Ferrets just like the Marshall ferrets if handled properly starting from the early age can be amiable, fun and docile.

They are not as wild as the dog or cat that nip or bite if they are aggravated or handled improperly. If you are opting to buy a Marshall ferret to be your pet, there are several things about these lovable pets especially on how to handle. That way you can be sure that you are buying the right ferret that suits you.

First thing you should know is about how the ferret smells. These wondrous animals have musky smell which most people find quite offensive but others don’t feel that it is not troublesome. Thus it is important to spend more time holding your ferret so that you will know how you will feel about its odor.

However, even the ferret was being descented, the smell still remains due to the odor that comes from the ferret’s skin glands. Hence, you don’t have to let anyone convince you that the odor can be removed because it is not true. In fact, bathing a ferret will not help remove the bad odor, instead it will make the odor stronger since the skin of a ferret will is being dry out so the skin glands will tend to make more oil.

Whether it is a Marshall ferret that you own which comes from the premiere ferret breeding company, still it is similar to those other ferrets that really smell bad. These animals were born to have scent glands that are capable of releasing strong odor. This is the reason why, some ferrets that are being sold in the US or in other countries, their glands have been removed.

If you want to read more about the cute marshall ferrets, Click Here! Ferret-Info.com